How to Change Your Mind | Official Trailer | Netflix



Academy Award-winning filmmaker Alex Gibney and New York Times best-selling author Michael Pollan present this documentary series event in four parts, each focused on a different mind-altering substance: LSD, psilocybin, MDMA, and mescaline. With Pollan as our guide, we journey to the frontiers of the new psychedelic renaissance – and look back at almost-forgotten historical context – to explore the potential of these substances to heal and change minds as well as culture. How to Change Your Mind is directed by Emmy-nominated filmmaker Alison Ellwood and two-time Academy Award-nominated and Emmy-winning filmmaker Lucy Walker.

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How to Change Your Mind | Official Trailer | Netflix
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Author Michael Pollan leads the way in this docuseries exploring the history and uses of psychedelics, including LSD, psilocybin, MDMA and mescaline.

27 replies
  1. Frank Rivera
    Frank Rivera says:

    Vice has been putting out informative videos on psychedelics since 2013 with Hamilton's pharmacopeia. It's nice to see Netflix shining a light on the medicinal aspects of psychedelics but I literally feel like I'm rewatching Hamilton's videos again lol. With that begin said it's a great series so far and it's nice to see some additional info being added. Not to forget an honourable mention to the trippy graphics and serene music from time to time

    Reply
  2. Lainer Martin
    Lainer Martin says:

    The evil part of these drugs is how Harvard and other institutions used it in their MK Ultra programs. THat's where the harm comes. The fact that governments ban the use of these substances is also another way to harm us and keep us from growing through experiencing these drugs.

    Reply
  3. Blunt Shame
    Blunt Shame says:

    I understand the intentions of this. But I truly worry about the other side of the coin. I know far too many who use these drugs as therapy and not in line with therapy and it becomes more detrimental than not.
    I'm glad that the therapeutic nature of these drugs is being highlighted, but ignoring the negatives puts a bad spin to me.

    Reply
  4. Andrew Miller
    Andrew Miller says:

    Our reason is a byproduct of the foreign mind. And that it is not to be trusted. I don't reject the capacity of reason to reach conclusions but how it is imposed on our lives as if it is the only alternative.
    We begin to grant the greatest to concepts like reality.
    Facing unusual situations like those which assault the sorcerer. We tell ourselves it is not reasonable and it seems we have said everything there is to say.
    The world of our minds of our mind is dictatorial, but fragile. After years of continuous use the self becomes so heavy that it is just common sense to give it a rest in order to continue ahead.
    I fight to break the description of the world which has been injected into me, in order to open up a space for new thing's. The war is against the self. For that purpose I try to be permanently aware of my potential
    Since the content of perception depends on the position of the assemblage point.
    I try with all my might to loosen the fixation of that point.
    People have made cults surrounding reason.only a high level of energy can enable one to deal with the world
    Rationality is a consequence of the fixation of the assemblage point in the position of reason and that point moves when I achieve internal silence.
    In my luminous field there are positions every bit of pragmatic as rationality
    When I achieve a point of view which includes reason as well as it twin center. Silent knowledge, concepts like truth and lies stop being operative and it becomes patently clear that mans true dilemma is to have energy or to not have it.
    I reason a different way the ordinary people. For me to anchor attention is insanity and to make it flow is common sense
    Rationality is not always sane. To stay sane is a voluntary act.
    While to be reasonable is just to fix our attention on an area of collective consent.
    I am not opposed to reason. I am opposed to it's dictatorship. The center of reason can take us very far. Absolute reason is merciless showing no pity or no mercy it doesn't stop half way. That why people are afraid of it. When we are able to focus on it with inflexibility it generates an obligation to be impeccable. Because not to beis not reasonable. To do all that is humanly possible and a little more. Therefore reason also takes you to a movement of perception.
    To act within the precepts of the control of behavior. You need clarity of purpose. The courage to take on the task and on an unbending intent. What I do need besto achieve is a condition of sustained energy gain until my attention can flow between reason and silent knowledge. When moving in that way I'm more sane than ever.

    Reply
  5. brandon davis
    brandon davis says:

    I’m planning on becoming one of the first license cultivators in Oregon of psilocybin containing mushrooms. This is a documentary I refer to often when attending public hearings

    Reply
  6. Andrew Miller
    Andrew Miller says:

    It sucks that none of these episodes covering the topics of non ordinary states of consciousness. Don't mention a person that I really admire. That person is Dr Stanizlov Grof. I grew up in the town of catonsville Maryland. Where Dr Stanizlov Grof conducted psychedelic therapy on patients with LSD on the property of spring Grove hospital. In catonsville Maryland. I have lived on that property of spring Grove hospital when I was living in a homeless shelter on the ground's of spring Grove hospital. Before I was aware of any of the topics surrounding entheogenic rituals and psychedelic medicine. That the psychedelic therapy that Dr Stanizlov Grof performed was in the the 1940s and 1950s on the property of spring Grove hospital, before LSD was made illegal. That I grew up in the same town where he cured patience way before I was born. That I was born in 1985. That I wasn't aware of the history of the town I grew up in until about ten years ago. I am now 37 years old. That I wasn't aware of anything of the topics of psychedelic medicine, that is curing patients with an array of mental health needs until about ten years ago. That the first information I learned on the topic of psychopharmacology and about psychedelic therapy was about Dr Stanizlov Grof curing patients who suffer from mental health illness. That I myself have cured my own childhood truama by learning and conducting my own psychedelic therapy on myself through all different types of research chemicals. That ten years after I started walking the path with heart and living intensely as a radiant luminous being. I have cured my childhood truama that is stored in the body. Through conducting psychedelic therapy on myself. I am a psychonuat and I practice spiritual principles surrounding entheogenic rituals. That me growing up in a town rich in psychedelic therapy history it is a synchronicity and has profoundly impacted my psyche in a way that allows me to heal and spread awareness of the truths of psychedelic medicine and the fact that it just doesn't heal, it cures.

    Reply
  7. MrSchweppes
    MrSchweppes says:

    “Psychedelics are illegal not because a loving government is concerned that you may jump out of a third story window. Psychedelics are illegal because they dissolve opinion structures and culturally laid down models of behaviour and information processing. They open you up to the possibility that everything you know is wrong.”
    ― Terence McKenna

    Reply
  8. Clint Golub
    Clint Golub says:

    I firmly believe we will see a revival of academic research into these incredible entheogenic substances within the next decade or sooner. Extremely grateful it looks like it’s going to happen in my lifetime. This literally could revolutionize suicide, depression, aggression, and the wanton desire for nation-state’s to go to war with each other at a pretty serious level. Not that these issues will ever truly go away, but we could seriously diminish them within the modern world if we incorporate Ibogaine, psilocybin, LSD, mescaline, salvia, in the right way.
    Right now however, it’s time we decriminalize and let the research institutions go to work exploring new ways forward in clinicals!

    Reply
  9. Based_MediumChungus17
    Based_MediumChungus17 says:

    That's cool and all,

    but don't let this distract you from the fact that if you think LSD should be legal but not fentanyl, then you are no better than the people who think that alcohol should be legal but not LSD.

    Reply
  10. Pixeltrainer
    Pixeltrainer says:

    Episodes 1, 2 and 3 were very informative. Episode 4 was horrible. While it provided an in-depth history of the plight of the Native American Church in its right to consume its sacrament, it FAILED to elucidate the actual use of mescaline. After making the arguement that Peyote should be reserved only for Native American use, episode 4 failed to provide any useful information on how San Pedro cactus could be used by therapists as a substitute. Feel free to skip episode 4.

    Reply
  11. Technic_Junglist
    Technic_Junglist says:

    Psychedelics saved my life. I'm so grateful for them. I was on big pharma meds for ptsd & bipolar and mushrooms not only helped my seizures, anxiety, mood, and cluster migraines but gave me hope when I was going to give up. I cannot praise them enough

    Reply
  12. Dom Lee
    Dom Lee says:

    If we want psychedelics to reach a wider audience, The information needs to pull the mind into it.
    Would be cool to ‘mix a movie in with a documentary’.

    It would be far ‘moe captivating’ for a wider audience.

    Reply

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